This is what Microsoft’s screen sharing adapter actually looks like

A step in the right direction. But the name seems curiously limiting – since it will actually work on all Miracast-capable devices.

Gigaom

Turns out it’s not a stick, after all: Microsoft’s Nokia subsidiary officially unveiled its answer to Chromecast Thursday, and it looks a little like a small hockey puck. The device, called Microsoft Screen Sharing For Lumia Phones – HD-10 of all things, uses Miracast to share a phone’s screen, and actually works with any Miracast-capable device, counter to what that name suggests. News about the device first popped up online two weeks ago.

microsoft miracast adapter HD-101

However, there’s a twist for Lumia phones: Microsoft’s screen sharing adapter also supports NFC, so you’ll only have to tap your phone against its screen sharing disc to launch into screen sharing mode. The adapter will go on sale later this month, and cost $79 in the U.S. as well as €79 in Europe.

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The shifting pay TV industry in two charts

Video consumption is only going in one direction. It’s only a matter of time before the migration hits a tipping point.

Gigaom

More than half of consumers with a connected TV have increased their use of over-the-top broadband TV sources in the last year, with 24 percent reporting a sizable increase according to data from the TDG Group. This television includes sources like Netflix (s nflx), YouTube (s goog) and Hulu, and the group’s research notes that this isn’t necessarily good news for the pay TV companies that are seeing subscriptions decline.

From the release announcing the study:

“That consumers are watching more over-the-top video is not itself surprising,” notes Michael Greeson, co-founder of TDG. “But to see such a widespread increase in OTT TV viewing is dramatic, especially as pay-TV subscriptions in the US are experiencing their greatest 12-month losses to date.”

tdgott

Meanwhile, with the rise in consumption of internet TV there’s a decline in pay TV subscribers. This is the third consecutive quarter of such quarter-over-quarter declines according to…

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Netflix to combat Breaking Bad spoilers on Twitter with new ‘Spoilerfoiler’ site

A nice idea from Netflix to help readers avoid unwanted spoilers on their Twitter feeds. It highlights the opportunity for further innovation around discovery and social media. There’s a lot more Twitter can do to help users find what they are interested in, and avoid what they don’t want to see. Let’s hope there’s more to come.